Gold prices halt two-session skid as dollar stalls – MarketWatch









Gold prices ended higher Thursday, after back-to-back losses, as a closely followed dollar gauge steadied.

June gold












GCM7, +0.18%










 rose $3.30, or 0.3%, to settle at $1,256.40 an ounce. July silver












SIN7, +0.16%










 rose 7.6 cents, or 0.4%, to $17.193 an ounce.

Gold prices ended lower for a second-straight session Wednesday, pressured by the view toward monetary policy. After gold’s close, minutes from the Fed appeared to show that the majority of the central bank’s officials remain resolute about hiking rates at their meeting in June. Financial markets are currently pricing in an 83% probability of a rate rise then, according to CME’s FedWatch tool.

The prospect of higher rates tends to weigh on gold, which doesn’t offer a yield.

“Traders made much of voting members saying it is ‘prudent to await evidence [that the first-quarter] slowdown is transitory,’ brushing off an otherwise familiar cautiously hawkish tone,” said Ilya Spivak, commodities and currency strategist with Daily FX. “The U.S. dollar dropped alongside front-end Treasury bond yields, boosting the appeal of anti-fiat and non-interest-bearing assets” including gold.

“Critically, investors’ priced-in outlook implied in Fed-funds futures still has a June rate hike as a near-certainty,” he said. “This hints that gold may find it difficult to extend gains unless the tidbit of reluctance that emerged in the minutes document is supported by hard economic data.”

The ICE U.S. Dollar












DXY, +0.12%










 was little changed near 97.20, with the dollar sputtering against major rivals though higher against so-called commodity currencies as oil prices












CLN7, -5.16%











LCON7, -4.91%










 fell in the wake of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries’ agreement to extend production cuts by nine months.

U.S. stocks climbed, trying for a sixth-straight advance and cutting some interest in haven gold in favor of so-called risk-on assets including equities, which draw bids when investor sentiment is upbeat.

Read: U.S. dollar rises against commodity currencies after OPEC agreement

Higher interest rates tend to be dollar-supportive, cutting demand for dollar-priced gold for investors using other currencies. Higher rates also weigh on demand for nonyielding gold in favor of yield-bearing investments.

Early Thursday, jobless-claims data showing that the U.S. labor market remains healthy eight years into an economic expansion appeared to support the expectation of a rate hike from the Fed as early as June.

In other metals trading, July copper












HGN7, +0.35%










 added 1.4 cents, or 0.5%, to $2.598 a pound. July platinum












PLN7, +0.17%










rose $5.60, or 0.6%, to $952.90 an ounce, while September palladium












PAM7, +1.08%










 rose $7.30, or 1%, to $768.50 an ounce.

The SPDR Gold Trust












GLD, -0.11%










 fell 0.2%, while the iShares Silver Trust












SLV, -0.31%










shed 0.3%. The VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF












GDX, -1.13%










 declined by 1.9%.























Man finds 2.78-carat diamond at Arkansas state park – ABC News

One man found the perfect last minute Mother’s Day gift for his wife when he spotted a small rock that turned out to be a diamond.

“When I told her I was going to find her a diamond for Mother’s Day I didn’t know I would actually find one,” Wendell Fox told ABC News about his find at the Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro, Arkansas, on May 13. “I sort of pre-committed so I had to follow through,” he said.

Fox, 70, and his wife Jennifer, 68, live in Joliet, Montana, most of the year, but as Arkansas natives, the pair knew the storied history behind the state park. “The diamond mine is part of Arkansas history and it’s the only one in the U.S.” he explained, unaware that the park had been a hot bed for other diamond-seekers in recent months.

PHOTO: Wendell Fox beside his wife Jennifer Fox at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas on May 13, 2017.Arkansas State Parks
Wendell Fox beside his wife Jennifer Fox at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas on May 13, 2017.

Fox said he and his wife were walking around the grounds for about an hour and a half “looking for a glimmer” when he noticed the gem.

“I was surface looking, walking very slowly and looking very slowly and I saw it,” Fox said. “I got down for a closer inspection because I wasn’t quite sure what to look for, but as soon as I saw it I thought, ‘that’s probably a diamond.'”

Fox showed the peanut-sized stone to his wife who told him to take it to the Diamond Discovery Center. When Fox pulled it from his pocket to show the employees, “one of the ladies sort of gasped and I just saw this big smile,” he said.

The staff confirmed that Fox discovered a 2.78-carat champagne colored diamond, the second-largest one registered at the park this year.

PHOTO: A 2.78 carat champagne brown diamond found in Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas on May 13, 2017.Arkansas State Parks
A 2.78 carat champagne brown diamond found in Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas on May 13, 2017.

Earlier in May Victoria Brodski of Tulsa, Oklahoma, found a 2.65-carat brown gem that she dubbed the Michelangelo Diamond. On March 11, Centerton, Arkansas, resident Kalel Langford found a 7.44-carat brown gem that he named Superman’s Diamond.

Fox named his gem “Way Out Yonder” as a tribute to their home in Montana. The gemstone will be made into a pendant for his wife, Jennifer.

“We still can’t believe that we found it. It was just by the grace of God and love,” Fox said.

Craft brewers are calling for the boycott of these 14 ‘imposter’ beer brands – Business Insider

Wicked WeedWicked Weed

Craft brewers are banding together to cut off beer brands acquired by Anheuser-Busch InBev, the largest brewer in the world.

Brew Studs, a blog dedicated to craft beer, published a list of brands acquired in part or completely by AB InBev — including Goose Island, Blue Point, and Wicked Weed — and is calling on craft-beer fans to ditch them.

“Welcome to the page that keeps you informed about impostor craft beer brands, those who try to benefit from the power of craft beer, even though they are aligned with forces who are trying to tear it down,” the post says.

AB InBev, the company behind brands like Budweiser and Busch, says it intends to help craft beer brands grow with its investment and that they’ll operate unchanged after acquisitions.

“To say our beers are ‘imposter’ craft ignores the intense skill, time and meticulous attention to detail that goes into making any great beer. And beyond that, our partnership couldn’t be less about trying to tear down craft,” Steve Crandall, founder and CEO of Devils Backbone, told Business Insider in an email. “It’s allowed us to hire many more craft beer-loving employees, invest in our local community through new facilities, and partner with other craft breweries on things like safety initiatives for brewers of all sizes.”

Some craft brewers remain unconvinced. Here are the 14 brands Brew Studs says fans should “cut off” because of their ties to AB InBev:

Gold attempts rebound after back-to-back declines – MarketWatch









Gold edged higher Thursday, after back-to-back losses, as a closely followed dollar index stalled. But gains could be limited in the lead-up to what’s widely expected to be another Federal Reserve interest-rate hike next month.

June gold












GCM7, +0.24%










 rose $1.60, or 0.1%, to $1,254.70 an ounce. July silver












SIN7, +0.37%










 rose 4 cents, or 0.3%, to $17.16 an ounce.

Gold prices ended lower for a second-straight session Wednesday, pressured by the view toward monetary policy. After gold’s close, minutes from the Federal Reserve’s May policy meeting appeared to show that the majority of the central bank’s officials remain resolute about hiking rates at their meeting in June. Financial markets are currently pricing in an 83% probability of a rate rise then, according to CME’s FedWatch tool.

“Traders made much of voting members saying it is ‘prudent to await evidence [that the first-quarter] slowdown is transitory,’ brushing off an otherwise familiar cautiously hawkish tone,” said Ilya Spivak, commodities and currency strategist with Daily FX. “The U.S. dollar dropped alongside front-end Treasury bond yields, boosting the appeal of anti-fiat and non-interest-bearing assets” including gold.

“Critically, investors’ priced-in outlook implied in Fed funds futures still has a June rate hike as a near-certainty,” he said. “This hints that gold may find it difficult to extend gains unless the tidbit of reluctance that emerged in the minutes document is supported by hard economic data.”

The ICE U.S. Dollar












DXY, +0.02%










 was little changed near 97.10, with the dollar sputtering against major rivals though higher against so-called commodity currencies. U.S. stocks indicated firmer trade, trying for a sixth-straight advance and cutting some interest in haven gold in favor of risk-on assets including equities.

Read: U.S. dollar rises against commodity currencies after OPEC agreement

Higher interest rates tend to be dollar-supportive, cutting demand for dollar-priced gold for investors using other currencies. Higher rates also weigh on demand for nonyielding gold in favor of yield-bearing investments.

Early Thursday, jobless claims data showing that the U.S. labor market remains quite robust eight years into an economic expansion did little to knock metals market thinking from a bet on higher interest rates.

In other metals trading, July copper












HGN7, +0.54%










 fell less than 1 cent, or 0.1%, to $2.5805 a pound. Copper prices continue to sag after China’s credit rating was downgraded by Moody’s for the first time in nearly 30 years earlier this week.

July platinum












PLN7, +0.65%










rose $5.90, or 0.6%, to $953.20 an ounce, while September palladium












PAM7, +0.57%










 rose $2.10, or 0.3%, to $763.30 an ounce.

The SPDR Gold Trust












GLD, -0.08%










 was up 0.1% premarket, while the iShares Silver Trust












SLV, -0.12%










added 0.1%. The VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF












GDX, -1.78%










 fell 0.7%.























Thieves steal more than $200000 in jewelry from Underground Atlanta store – FOX 5 Atlanta

– Atlanta police are looking for four thieves they said burglarized an Underground Atlanta jewelry store and took off with more than $200,000 in jewelry.

In a surveillance video, investigators said you could see the crooks make their way into Underground wearing hoodies and gloves; one of them is armed with a crowbar. Detectives said the thieves used the crowbar to pry open the door to Diamond and Company and in less than three minutes, smashed the display cases and stole diamonds, watches and other high-end jewelry.

Investigators said the surveillance video also shows the four crooks running up the stairs with large garbage bags, filled with jewelry. The burglary happened Wednesday just after one in the morning. Police believe the burglary was planned and that the crooks had spent time inside the store, casing it out.

Atlanta Police ask anyone with information to contact Crime Stoppers 404.577.TIPS.

In St. Paul, it was a Neil Diamond in the rough – StarTribune.com – Minneapolis Star Tribune

For sure, it was just a coincidence. Don’t cha think?

On Wednesday at St. Paul’s Xcel Energy Center, Neil Diamond, 76, brought his 50th anniversary concert tour to Bob Dylan’s home state on what was Dylan’s 76th birthday. And it was 50 years ago that Diamond made his Minnesota debut in — where else? — Duluth, where Dylan was born.

Diamond and Dylan don’t often get mentioned in the same sentence even though their names and songs are certainly familiar to music lovers round the world.

Both Rock Hall of Famers now have distinctively gravelly voices, for better or worse. Both still tour and record. But otherwise they have about as much in common as their best known records from 1966 — Dylan’s landmark and hugely influential album “Blonde on Blonde” and Diamond’s cheesy “Cherry Cherry,” the second song on Wednesday’s set list.

Diamond was in good voice: strong, clear, passionate with very little shouting and oversinging. His voice was as impressive this time as it was two years ago at X, one of the best of his 40-some shows in Minnesota.

But his energy and spirit were lacking. The Bruce Springsteen for the easy-listening set manifested no physicality on Wednesday. And that was a Twin Cities first for the veteran arena crowd-pleaser.

Take it from Marlee Ruane, 86, of Bloomington, who has seen every Diamond concert in the metro since 1972.

“He was barely moving, on his tip toes,” she observed. “He’s so different from two years ago. So skinny. That shirt is hanging on him.”

Yes, Mr. Forever in Skinny Jeans moved gingerly, as if he’d suddenly aged or was suffering from an injury that impinged movement. Moreover, his face broadcast a Dylanesque perma-pout.

Diamond was grimacing as he roared through the festive “Soolaimon.” He looked catatonic on 2008’s “Pretty Amazing Grace,” a happy song about late-in-life love.

During “Beautiful Noise,” he delivered the line “it makes me feel good” with a pained visage. On “I’m a Believer” (the smash he wrote for Monkees in ’67), he growled “I’m in love” with a scowl. Hard to believe that line.

Diamond summoned the passion on “Holly Holy,” which brought the 18,000 fans to their feet.

He got them to sing along to “Sweet Caroline,” the karaoke classic during which he sounded a bit froggy and lacked his usual oomph. But he did manage to finally crack a smile at song’s end.

While “Caroline” may have been a crowd favorite, the highlights in the two-hour show were when the carefully choreographed entertainer went off script. Five songs into the night, he announced that the concert was dedicated to the people of Manchester, England, without mentioning the tragic killings at Ariana Grande’s concert there. Then he delivered “Dry Your Eyes,” which was cast as a slowed-down Irish march.

Also outstanding was “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers,” during which Diamond cannily substituted Larry Klimas’ evocative saxophone for the lines that Barbra Streisand sings on the recorded version. That arrangement changed the texture but not the emotion.

There were some dubious choices in the set list including the 1976 album track “Jungle Time,” which suggested Steve Miller trying to be Bruce Springsteen. There were countless Diamond gems — “Kentucky Woman,” “Shilo,” “Hello Again” among others — that fans might have preferred. But Diamond, like Dylan, has just too many memorable songs in his repertoire.

 

Craft brewers boycott brands acquired by Anheuser-Busch … – Business Insider

Wicked WeedWicked Weed

Craft brewers are banding together to cut off beer brands that have been acquired by Anheuser-Busch InBev, the largest brewer in the world. 

Brew Studs, a blog dedicated to craft beer, has created a list of brands that have been acquired (in part or completely) by AB InBev — and is calling on craft beer fans to ditch the brands, including Goose Island, Blue Point, and Wicked Weed. 

“Welcome to the page that keeps you informed about impostor craft beer brands, those who try to benefit from the power of craft beer, even though they are aligned with forces who are trying to tear it down,” reads the post. 

AB InBev, the company behind brands like Budweiser and Busch, has maintained that the company only intends to help craft brands grow with their investment, and that brands will continue to operate unchanged by acquisitions.  

However, some craft brewers remain unconvinced. Here are the 14 brands Beer Studs says fans should “cut off” due to their ties to AB InBev. 

Gold Price Chart: Find all the latest gold rate chart and news – Economic Times

Gold held steady on Thursday to keep most of its gains from the previous session, with the dollar slipping after minutes of the US Federal Reserve’s last policy meeting dampened hopes for an aggressive string of interest rate hikes. READ MORE

WHAT’S HAPPENING TODAY IN INDIA
Precious metals gold and silver were trading higher in early trade on Thursday following weakness in the dollar after minutes of the US Federal Reserve’s last policy meeting downplayed the chance of more aggressive interest rate hikes. READ MORE

WHAT HAPPENED YESTERDAY
Gold wrested control of the Rs 29,000 level by rising Rs 185 to Rs 29,100 per 10 grams today, taking strength from the scattered buying by local jewellers amid a firm trend overseas. READ MORE

IF RATES ARE STEADY, GOLD LOAN NBFCS MAY SEE 28 PER CENT GROWTH: Gold demand in India increased by 15 per cent during the first quarter of 2017 to 123.5 tonne, signalling a return of optimism in the industry, according to World Gold Council (WGC). READ MORE

METAL MANIA – Gold imports rise 200% as cash makes a comeback: A jump in retail demand, thanks to the increase of cash in circulation since demonetisation, and the low base effect last year are behind the spurt in gold imports in April from a year ago. READ MORE

Craft Brewers Bitter Over Beer Bill – CBS DFW

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Craft breweries in Texas feel a new “beer bill” could end up costing Texans whether they drink or not.

HB 3287 aims to put restrictions on breweries who produce a certain amount of beer every year.

If the bill becomes law, it would force breweries that produce 225,000 barrels of beer annually to sell and then buy back their own beer if they want to sell it in a taproom.

The bill passed the Texas House in early May and just passed the Senate this week. It now sits on the desk of Governor Abbott to sign into law.

“Just complete, utter shock,” said John Reardon of Deep Ellum Brewing. “I don’t think anyone would ever think something like this could be passed in today’s Texas.”

Reardon does not understand why the bill is needed. He also does not think he should have to buy back his own beer from a distributor in order to sell in his taproom.

“They just kind of bump up against your dock and pick up a check,” said Reardon.

The bill’s author is Fort Worth House Rep. Craig Goldman. He feels it is designed to protect smaller breweries from larger beer companies and help create a barrier of bigger brewers from gaining too strong of a hold on the local market.  

“It’s not about beer, it’s about business,” said Wim Bens of Lakewood Brewing Co. “And it’s about someone’s potential being limited. And that’s un-American and that’s un-Texan.”

Bens said when he started his brewery five years ago, there were only 60 breweries in Texas. Now, there are more than 200 craft beer companies. He said each one is creating jobs, adding to the tax base and helping the local economy.

“Why put a cap on it at all? It’s limiting our growth,” said Bens.

Bens suspects if his brewery gets near the limit, he will have to start looking at other states to move to and expand. He already knows of breweries looking to move.

“It’s a sad day in Texas when Louisiana and Oklahoma are looking like better states to do business in,” said Bens.

Reardon said his big plans for expansion are now down the drain.

“It really just says that Texas is closed for business,” said Reardon.

Multiple calls and email to Representative Goldman were not returned.

Craft: The Moore the merrier – Bloomington Pantagraph (blog)

‘+

‘+__tnt.truncateStr(oAsset.title,85,’…’)+’

‘+

‘+